Joel L. Carlin: Curriculum Vitae

Note: Dr. Carlin is on sabbatical leave until August 2014.

Education

Ph.D., Fisheries. 2003. University of Florida (UF) Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. Advisor: William J. Lindberg. Dissertation Title: "Genetic variation at different taxonomic levels in the groupers (Osteichthyes, Serranidae: Epinephelinae)."

M.Sc., Zoology. 1995. Louisiana State University (LSU) Dept. of Zoology and Physiology. Advisor: David A. Good. Thesis Title: "Variation in long-tailed (Eurycea longicauda) and three-lined (E. guttolineata) salamanders."

B.S., Marine Biology. 1991. University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW).

Biology major, 1987-1989. Purdue University at Fort Wayne.


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Teaching Experience

Gustavus Adolphus College Department of Biology. 2006-present. Assistant Professor.

Fall and Spring Semester Courses

Bio 100 Biology Explorations: Fish and Fisheries (Fall 2008). This course is designed primarily for non-science majors. As such, the material will focus primarily on the fundamental concepts in ecology, physiology and evolution that underlie fishing, a vital part of the world’s economy. Although non-biological factors will be discussed, it is assumed that students will gain political, economic, sociological perspectives in other courses. Labs for this course are a mixture of dissections, field experiences, class discussions and computer modelling. Six contact hours per week, NASP.

Bio 101 Principles of Biology (Fall 2006, 2007, 2010). A general introduction to the study of biology. Topics include the structural organization of organisms, cellular reproduction, basic metabolism, genetics, ecology and evolution. Four lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Lectures include pre-exam reviews via case studies exploring marine symbioses, catatonia in goats, Burkitt’s lymphoma and cancer genomics. Laboratory skills taught include statistical concepts, microscopy and critical thinking in experimental design. Five contact hours per week, NASP.

Bio 102 Organismal Biology (Spr 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010). This course covers the basics of plant and animal organization. Topics include phylogeny, development and the structural-functional relationships of plants and animals. Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Course includes small group work, discussions of science publishing and online discussion forums. Laboratory skills taught include scientific writing and statistical concepts. Seven contact hours per week.

Bio 245 Conservation Biology (Fall 2008, 2009, 2010). Bio 245 serves both biology majors and non-majors within the Environmental Studies program. The material presented is focused primarily on fundamental concepts in ecology, genetics, and evolution that underlie efforts to understand the world’s biological diversity. Labs for this course are primarily field trips to teach ecological data collection. Labs also include computer modeling and some discussion. In addition to biology, students will gain exposure to the various political, economic, sociological perspectives on the environment. Six contact hours per week.

Bio 383 Aquatic Biology (Fall 2007, 2009). A study of the success and distribution of organisms in aquatic habitats. Lecture periods include primary literature discussions and guest lecturers. Laboratory work explores water chemistry, catchment morphometry, aquatic adaptations, and fisheries science with an emphasis upon aquatic habitat sampling and experimental design. Six contact hours per week.

Bio 385 Evolution (Spring 2008, 2009, 2010). Morphological, behavioral and genetic changes are discussed on the scales of populations, species and higher order taxa. Lecture periods include primary literature discussions. Special topics include evolutionary psychology, coalescence theory, Bayesian analysis, hominid evolution, and AIDS. Four contact hours per week.


January Interim Experience Courses

Bio 121 Biology and Conservation of Wolves (Jan 2008). We will study the fields of evolution, genetics, community ecology and conservation biology with a well-studied socially complex predator as a single case study. Class activities include extensive writing, mathematical modeling as well as guided discussions. First-hand experiences of wolf behavior and wildlife ecology, including tracking and radiotelemetry, will be undertaken at the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota.

Bio 146 Natural History of Ecuador and the Galápagos (Jan 2009, 2011). Students master the basic principles of biogeography, evolution and ecology while experiencing the unique but varied ecosystems of Ecuador. In addition, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of conservation in a developing nation. Students conduct a regional transect from wet tropical forest to cloud forest to subalpine wetland/prairie (paramo) to tropical dry forest to dry islands (the Galápagos). Assessment includes travel readiness, discussion participation, field notes, essays and the calculation/comparison of biodiversity indices.

Whitman College Department of Biology. 2003-2006. Visiting Assistant Professor.

Biol 111 Biological Principles (Fall 2004, Fall 2005). A survey of biological chemistry, cell biology, genetics and mammalian physiology. Lectures included pre-exam reviews via case studies (e.g., phototropism, Burkitt's lymphoma). Laboratory skills included experimental design, basic statistics, writing lab reports, peer-reviewed presentations on scientific literature, and basic concepts in statistics.

Biol 112 The Biological World (Spring 2005; half semester). A survey of organismal biology emphasizing diversity and adaptation; I taught the first half of both lecture and labs, introducing evolution and reviewing non-animal life. Required course for biology majors.

Biol 130 Conservation Biology (Fall 2003, Spring 2004). A lecture and laboratory course complementing the Environmental Studies program, providing a strong biological foundation to non-science majors. Essay writing was emphasized, as was the use of biology data for informed management practices. Labs were a mixture of field and analysis experiences.

Biol 172 Fish and Fisheries (Spring 2005, Spring 2006). A non-majors science course covering the evolution, physiology and ecology of fishes, as well as fisheries economics, law and management. Fisheries of Alaska, eastern Africa, Nova Scotia, Polynesia and Washington state were used as case studies. A laboratory section concentrated upon fish anatomy, physiology and evolution, including field trips and talks with state and tribal fisheries biologists.

Biol 205 Genetics (Fall 2003, Spring 2004; half semester each). I taught the non-molecular half of the lecture, including cellular, population, and evolutionary genetics and genomics within an evolutionary framework. Primary literature, popular science writing, examples from human medicine and biodiversity conservation supplemented the lecture material.

Biol 278 Marine Biology (Spring 2006). A majors elective that stresses anatomical, physiological and biochemical adaptations to the marine environment. An optional laboratory is taught for a week at University of Washington's Friday Harbor Marine Laboratory (San Juan I., WA), which consists of intertidal sampling and subtidal trawling.

Biol 350 Evolutionary Biology (Spring 2004). Lectures covered a review of population genetics, hominid evolution and speciation theory. A third of course involved journal article discussion, and an optional field trip to John Day Fossil Bed National Monument was provided. Course emphasized experimental design and current issues in evolution.

Biol 471 Island Biogeography (Fall 2004). A majors elective which combined lectures with discussions of Quammen's Song of the Dodo. Lectures explored floral and faunal insularism as well as experimental design in modern biogeography, featuring metapopulation theory, GAP analysis, phylogeography, MVPs, PVA, reserve design and phylogeography.

University of Florida Honors Program / Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. 2003. Instructor.

WIS 2552H Global Perspectives in Biodiversity Conservation (Spring).

University of Charleston Grice Marine Biological Laboratory. 1997-1998. Associate Instructor.

Guest lecturer, Bio 600 Molecular Physiology. Service on textbook and student committees.

Louisiana State University

Louisiana State University Summer Youth Program. 1995. Instructor.

Marine Biology (Lecture, lab).

Louisiana State University Dept. of Zoology and Physiology. 1992-1995. Teaching Assistant.

Bio 2153 Principles of Genetics.

Bio 1002 Introductory Biology for Biology Majors Laboratory.

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Peer-Reviewed Publications

Carlin JL, Consoer M*, Hagan C*, Johnson MJ*, McDermet J*, and Schwartz J. 2011. Habitat and genetic diversity of margined sculpin, Cottus marginatus, in the Walla Walla and Touchet Rivers, Oregon and Washington, USA. Northwest Science 86(3):153-167.

Carlin JL. 2011. Mutations are the raw materials of evolution. Nature Education Knowledge 2(1):10.

Carlin JL. 2010. An investigative alternative to single-species dissection in the introductory biology laboratory. BioScene 36(2):28-33.

Ramírez MA, Patricia-Acevedo J, Planas S1, Carlin JL, Funk SM and McMillan WO. 2006. New microsatellite resources for groupers (Serranidae). Molecular Ecology Notes 6(3):813-817.

Bowen BW, Bass AL, Muss AJ, Carlin JL and Robertson DR. 2006. Phylogeography of two Atlantic squirrelfishes (family Holocentridae): exploring links between pelagic larval duration and population connectivity. Marine Biology 149:899-913.

Morato T, Afonso P and Carlin JL. 2004. First record of scamp, Mycteroperca phenax, in the north-eastern Atlantic. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 84(1):281-282.

Carlin JL, Robertson DR and Bowen BW. 2003. Ancient divergence and recent connections in the tropical Atlantic reef fishes Epinephelus adscensionis and Rypticus saponaceous (Percoidei: Serranidae). Marine Biology 143(6):1057-1069.

Ball AO, Sedberry GR, Zatcoff M, Chapman RW and Carlin JL. 2000. Population structure of wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) determined using microsatellite genetic markers. Marine Biology 137(5-6):1077-1090.

Sedberry GR, Andrade CAP, Carlin JL, Chapman RW, Luckhurst BE, Manooch III CS, Menezes G, Thomsen B and Ulrich GF. 1999. Wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) in the North Atlantic: Fisheries, biology, and management of a widely distributed and long-lived fish. American Fisheries Society Symposium 23: 27-50.

Sedberry GR, Carlin JL and Ulrich GF. 1998. Movements of a pelagic-phase wreckfish, Polyprion americanus, as indicated by tag and recapture. Arquipelago 18: 69-72.

Carlin JL. 1997. Morphological and genetic differentiation between long-tailed (Eurycea longicauda) and three-lined (E. guttolineata) salamanders (Caudata: Plethodontidae). Herpetologica 53(2): 206-217.

Sedberry GR, Carlin JL, Chapman RW and Eleby B. 1996. Population structure in the pan-oceanic wreckfish, Polyprion americanus (Teleostei: Polyprionidae), as indicated by mtDNA variation. Journal of Fish Biology 49 (Supplement A): 318-329.


Other Publications

Carlin JL. 2003. Genetic variation among populations and species of epinepheline fishes (Percoidei: Serranidae). Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Florida. 101 pp.

Carlin JL. 2002. Evolution of cytochrome b in epinepheline fishes (Percoidei: Serranidae). Pp. 1-12 in (Howard K and MacKinlay D, eds.): Fish Performance: Studies in Fish Biology International Congress on the Biology of Fish. University of British Columbia, Vancouver Canada.

Sedberry GR, Ball AO, Carlin JL, Chapman RW, Ulrich GF and Zatcoff MS. 1999. Stock structure in wreckfish, Polyprion americanus, determined by tagging and molecular genetic techniques. MARFIN Project Number NA57FF0290 Final Report. 69 pp.

Carlin JL. 1995. Variation in long-tailed (Eurycea longicauda) and three-lined (E. guttolineata) salamanders. MS Thesis, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. 68 pp.

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Grants

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid (student PIs). 2010. Two students awarded a total of $ 961

2010 NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center $ 10800

2009 NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center $ 27927

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid (student PI). 2009. $ 391

NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center. 2008. $22027

Merck / AAAS Undergraduate Research Program. 2008. $2500

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid (student PI). 2007. $ 400

Greater Gustavus Fund: Summer Research (student co-PI). 2007. $2500

Gustavus Adolphus College Faculty Development Site Visit. 2007. $2000

Whitman College Perry Fund for Undergraduate Research. 2005. $5345

NASA Undergraduate Research Program. 2005. $ 3000

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid (student PI's). 2005. $ 875 (total)

The PADI Foundation, Inc. 2001. $ 800

Int'l Women's Fishing Assoc. Ryan Kelley Scholarship Trust. 2000. $1000

PADI Project AWARE Foundation MicroGrant. 2000. $5000

ASIH Edward C. Raney Fund. 1999. $ 870

Int'l Women's Fishing Assoc. Ryan Kelley Scholarship Trust. 1999. $1000

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid. 1999. $ 870

Int'l Women's Fishing Assoc. Ryan Kelley Scholarship Trust. 1998. $1000

Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid. 1993. $ 500

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Awards

Certificate of Appreciation for Service. 2006. The American Fisheries Society Genetics Section. Received at the 2006 annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society.

Most Enthusiastic Faculty Award. 2005. Delta Gamma Sorority, Whitman College Chapter.

Stoye Award for Best Student Oral Presentation. 2001. The American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

Jim Wright Graduate Award. 2001. American Fisheries Society Genetics Section.

Rottman Achievement Award for graduate student members. 1999. Florida Chapter of the American Fisheries Society.



Undergraduate Research Projects

Response of demersal fish assemblages to petroleum in the Gulf of Mexico.

Student activities include:

Hammer J. (’11) and J. VerMeer (’11) are currently optimizing PCR primers from fishes in the Gulf of Mexico.

Genetic stock identification in the American monkfish Lophias americanus. With A. Johnson (U. Maryland Eastern Shore) and A. Richards (NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Maryland). Genetic stock identification and effective population size estimation in what may be two separate stocks of a commercially valuable marine fish. Supported by a 2008 NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center Research Grant.

Student activities include:

Nguluwe B. (U. Maryland Eastern Shore) and D. Follis (Gustavus Adolphus). Genomic DNA isolation, microsatellite optimization and analysis.

Conservation genetics and habitat assessment of a Washington Species of Special Concern, the margined sculpin Cottus marginatus. With J Schwartz (Fisheries Program, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation). Field surveys of 26 sites completed, sequencing of two mtDNA genes and one microsatellite locus characterized. Supported by 2007 Greater Gustavus Fund for Summer Research, 2007 and 2005 Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid, 2005 Perry Fund Award and 2005 Washington NASA Space Grant. Three undergraduate theses and five independent studies completed. Manuscript in review.

Gustavus Adolphus College student activities include:

Betzler S. Microsatellite optimization and mtDNA phylogeny. Presented at 2008 Sigma Xi Student Undergraduate Research Symposium and Summer Research Fall Symposium. Coauthor of presentation at 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Soceity, Ottawa ON.

Consoer M. Multivariate analyses of fish habitats. 2008 independent study credit. Coauthor of presentation at 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Soceity, Ottawa ON.

Molitor R. Microsatellite variation. Presented at 2007 Summer Research Fall Symposium. Coauthor of presentation at 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Soceity, Ottawa ON.

Freeman D. Clear-and-stain procedures, comparative skeletal anatomy. 2007 volunteer.

Schultz J. Comparative skeletal and morphometric anatomy. 2007 volunteer.

Hanson K. Age-growth analysis. 2007 volunteer.

Whitman College student activities include:

Hagan C. Mitochondrial DNA variation. Presented at 2007 Oregon Chapter meeting of the American Fisheries Society, Eugene OR. Poster presented at 2006 American Genetics Association special symposium The Genetics of Speciation, Vancouver BC.

Johnson M. Ecological surveys. 2006 student research intern with Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Presented at 2007 Oregon Chapter and 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society. Poster presented at 2005 NASA Summer Undergraduate Research Program Conference, Seattle WA.

McDermet J. Ecological surveys and mitochondrial DNA variation. 2007 student research intern with Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Presented at 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society, San Francisco CA.

Sprague L. Sculpin meristics. 2006 independent study credit.

Watanabe Y. DNA isolation. 2005 volunteer.

Additional Undergraduate Projects at Gustavus Adolphus College

Kesty K. 2008. Merck/AAAS summer research student. Presented at 2008 Summer Research Fall Symposium.

Kesty K. 2008. Genomic isolation techniques for DNA recovery from dogfish shark Squalus acanthias.

Deuvel M. 2007. Viral-mediated gene transfer in Arabidopsis evolution.

Magnusson A. 2007. Developing a biotic integrity baseline and regional reference for southeastern Minnesota and the Seven Mile Creek Watershed.

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Advising

Gustavus Adolphus College Department of Biology. 2006-present. Assistant Professor.

Academic advisor to Biology and Environmental Studies majors, 2007 - present.

Sponsor and Speaker. 2008-2011. Cover Letter and Resume Writing Workshop for biology majors.

Member. 2007, 2008. Tri-Beta Biology Honors Society graduate school advice panel.

Mentor. 2007, 2008. First-year Students of Color Mentoring Program.

Speaker, 2007, 2008. “The Biology major at Gustavus.” Explore Gustavus! presentation.

Faculty advisor. 2007-2008, 2010-present. Gustavus women’s lacrosse team.

Sponsor and Speaker. 2008. “Intelligent Design on Trial.” Movie and discussion panel with A. Gishlick (visiting, Geology) and S. Johnson (Religion) as co-panelists.

Banquet speaker. 2007. Gustavus Tri-Beta Society Induction. “What biology has to say about gender and beauty.”

Active participant, 2006-present. Gustavus Greens, bbb Biology Honors Society.

Whitman College Department of Biology. 2003-2006. Visiting Assistant Professor.

I served as research advisor for two Honors Senior Theses, five Senior Theses and six Independent Study projects, covering a range of topics from molecular genetics to plant conservation.

I mentored two undergraduate student presentations at professional conferences and nine oral presentations at Whitman Undergraduate Conferences.

I began and maintained a website and listserv detailing research grants, internships and jobs for undergraduates in biology and environmental science (especially but not exclusive to ecology, molecular genetics and evolution). Listserv currently sent to colleges in California, Florida, Washington and Canada.

University of Florida Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 1998-2002. Research assistant.

Mentored post-baccalaureate student research project.

University of Charleston Grice Marine Biological Laboratory. 1997-1998. Associate Instructor.

Thesis committee for R. Wingrove (M.S.,1999) on dolphinfish population genetics.

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Institutional Service

Gustavus Adolphus College Department of Biology. 2006-present. Assistant Professor.

Biology Department Coordinator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Bio-Che curriculum integration committee. 2011-2012. HHMI Initiative to integrate introductory Biology and Chemistry courses.

Member, English Language Learning working group. 2009-present. B. Kaiser, chair.

Committee Member, Sister City Planning Committee. 2010-present. J. Rathlef, chair.

Environmental Studies program. Interim Co-Director (2007-2008) and Committee Member, (2006-present).

Curriculum Integration (Biology), Howard Hughes Medical Institute program committee. 2009-2010. HHMI Initiative to integrate introductory Biology and Chemistry courses. C. Jacks, chair.

Interim Co-Director, Environmental Studies program. 2008-2009. Committee Member, Environmental Studies program, 2006-present.

Committee Member (Natural Sciences and Mathematics representative), Course Approval Subcommitee of Curriculum Committee. 2007-present.

Committee Member, Nobel Conference Planning Committee. 2007-09 and 2011-12. Planning and Speaker hosting for 2008 Nobel (Human Origins), 2009 (Water) and 2012 (Oceans).

Summer Registration. 2007, 2008. Incoming student advising (3 and 2 days, respectively).

Summer Snapshot. 2008. Prospective student teaching demonstration: “The Ecology of Shark Attacks.”

Committee Member, Faculty Search 2008. Search for 2008-09 visiting assistant professor of Biology position in behavioral ecology.

Author, Bio 102 Organismal Biology laboratory manual revision. 2008. Authored four labs in protistan and fungal diversity and comparative vertebrate anatomy.

Interviewer, 2007. Potential President’s scholars, Scholarship Day.

Chair, Visibility Subcommittee of the Summer Student Research Committee. 2007. Designed departmental and divisional promotion materials, including Summer Research Student website.

Chair, Bio 101 Principles of Biology course revision ad hoc committee. 2006-2007. Served as editor for custom laboratory manual written by many departmental authors.


Academic Service

Newsletter editor. 1999-present. The American Fisheries Society Genetics Section.

Chair, AFS Web Advisory Committee, 2007-2010. Also served as editorial advisor, 2003-2006. Responsible for societal website content, online data sharing, and annual meeting websites. Service acknowledged in the Aug 2007 issue of Fisheries.

Education committees, 2002-present. The American Fisheries Society, The Society for the Study of Evolution. Member, Association of College and University Biology Educators.

Publications Oversight Committee, 2007-2010. The American Fisheries Society.

Grant reviewer. 2006-2011. North Pacific Research Board. Two grant applications reviewed.

Grant reviewer. 2007. Florida Sea Grant. One grant application reviewed.

Workshop Chair, “Information Technology at AFS.” 2007, 2008. Annual Meetings of the American Fisheries Society. San Francisco CA, 2007; Ottawa ON, 19-21 August 2008.

Research consultant. 2007. Developed biology instructional materials (now implemented in Bio 100 and Bio 383) involving the Seven Mile Creek watershed of the Minnesota River Basin in support of an NSF grant to J. Jeremiason (Chemistry) and M. Bjelland (Geography). Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Manuscript reviews. Marine Biology, 2005; Conservation Biology, 2004; Contributions in Marine Science, 2001; Journal of Herpetology, 1997, 1999; Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 2001.

Panelist. 2004. Faculty workshop on Academic Job Search. Center for Teaching and Learning, Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Review of World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF-UK) project final reports. 2001. In conjunction with Dr. Robert Buschbacher, UF Dept. of Wildlife Ecology Conservation, Gainesville FL.

Scientific Meeting Presentations. 1989-present. Eleven presentations (incl. 2 posters) given to 9 national or regional meetings of professional scientific societies. Session co-chair, 2004, Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. Recipient, 2001 ASIH Stoye Award for Best Student Paper in Genetics/ Morphology/Development session. Session chair, 2000, 8th Mid-Year Meeting of the Amer. Fisheries Society Southern Division.

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Public Service

Environmental Consultant. 2010. Evaluation of the pueblos of Petatlán District, Guerrero, for aquaculture, ecotourism and endangered species management. Interviews of exotic animal veterinarians, vice president of Petatlán, technical university dean and environmental planner from Xihuatanejo. Field tour of environments with agency personnel in January 2010.

Public Seminars. 1995-present. Eleven presentations given, incl.: Walla Walla Watershed Council, Whitman College Environmental House, UF Honors Program, UF Marine Biology Club, Univ. dos Azores, Field Museum of Natural History Urban Youth Volunteer Program, LSU Museum of Natural Science and others. A complete list is available upon request.

Volunteer Hurricane Relief Construction. 2006, 2007. Cleanup from Hurricane Katrina. With Gustavus Adolphus Women’s Lacrosse team (2007). Ocean Springs MS.

Volunteer Riparian Restoration Labor. 2003-2006. Tri-State Steelheaders Fisheries Enhancement Group, Walla Walla WA. Featured in Tri-City Herald, 30 Oct 2004: A1-A2.

Alumni Educator. 2006. The biology and politics of high-seas fishing. Whitman College Summer College, Walla Walla WA.

Volunteer Educator. 2005. Palouse Community School, Walla Walla Co., WA.

Volunteer Educator. 2005. Three presentations on careers in marine science, grades 6-8. TRIO Educational Talent Search, Walla Walla Co., WA.

Demonstration Artist. 2004, 2005. Public demonstrations of graphite/pastel techniques, Walla Walla Fair Fine Arts Gallery, Walla Walla WA.

Volunteer Docent. 2001-2002. Fishing For Success youth conservation education program. UF Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Gainesville FL.

Volunteer Naturalist. 2000. Seahorse Key Marine Lab, Cedar Key FL.

Volunteer Educator. 1996, 1998. SC Dept. of Natural Resources Fishing Fair, Charleston SC.

Volunteer Docent. 1993-1995. LSU Museum of Natural Science, Baton Rouge LA.


Training

First Term Seminar instruction workshop. 2008. Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter MN.

“New Faculty Workshop: Planning for Career Success.” 2008. Pew Midstates Consortium for Math and Science. Hope College, Holland MI.

Safety training for operation of 11-passenger vehicles. 2007. Gustavus Adolphus College.

“Adapting to Multicultural Learning Styles” training. 2005. Whitman College.

Overseas field experience (Azores, Bahamas, Hong Kong, Madeira, Mexico, Puerto Rico) collecting genetic and life history samples. 1996-2003.

Completed "Gene Expression analysis: Microarrays and Real Time PCR." 2001. Advanced molecular biology laboratory course. ICBR Education Core, Gainesville FL.

Completed SCUBA Certification, Open Water Diver. 2001. PADI.

Training in water quality sampling and electrofishing. 1999, 2000. UF Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Gainesville FL.

Reef fish life history sampling. 1995-1998. With Marine Resource Monitoring and Assessment Program (MARMAP), MRRI, SC Dept. of Natural Resources, Charleston SC.

Completed "Recent Advances in Conservation Genetics." 1997. Intensive training course, competitive entry. Smithsonian Institution/ NOAHS Center, Front Royal VA.

Training in curatorial techniques for vertebrates and tissues. 1992-1993. With David Good of the LSU Museum of Natural Science, Baton Rouge LA.

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Select Presentations

Adventures in Ecuador.” 23 March 2011. Public presentation, Linneaus Arboretum, Gustavus Adolphus College.

A Trip to the Galápagos and Ecuador” 9 December 2010. Kiwanis Club, Saint Peter Chapter.

Undergraduate research in aquatic conservation.” 3 April 2009. Shop Talk, Gustavus Adolphus College.

Aquatic underdogs: molecular ecology and fish conservation.” 2007. Departmental research seminar, University of Minnesota at Mankato, Mankato MN.

How to be a little fish in a big pond. 2005. Interdisciplinary faculty seminar, Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Student research and the conservation of margined sculpin. 2006. Walla Walla Watershed Council meeting.

Research at the moment of evolution. 2005. SigmaXi Walla Walla Chapter.

Choosing between grad schools, jobs, and ice cream. 2003. Environmental House, Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Groupers, the live reef fish trade, and wildlife forensics. 2003. Environmental House, Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Trade in live reef fish and endangered species products in Hong Kong. 2000. UF Marine Biology Club; UF Eco-Lunch Seminar Series; UF Dept. of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Gainesville FL.

I got the hook-up: fishery biology and phylogeography of the wreckfish, Polyprion americanus. 1999. UF Marine Biology Club, Gainesville FL.

Fishery biology, life history and genetic stock structure of wreckfish, Polyprion americanus, in the North Atlantic Ocean. 1998. Depto. Oceanografia e Pescas, Universidade dos Azores. Horta, Azores, Portugal.

An introduction to Louisiana herpetofauna. 1997. Dept. of Biology, College of Charleston, Charleston SC.

Voices in the night: frog calls. 1996. Urban Youth Volunteer Program. Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago IL.

A tail of two salamanders: Variation in long-tailed (Eurycea longicauda) and three-lined (E. guttolineata) salamanders. 1995. Thesis defense. Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA.

Crocodiles: More than teeth and tail. 1995. Museum presentation. Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge LA.

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Guest Lectures

Marketing opportunities and Sustainable agriculture in Petatlán, Mexico. 2011. E/M 355 Marketing Research. Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Sermon: "Genesis 1 and the Theory of Evolution. Good Samaritan United Methodist Church, Saint Peter, MN.

Gender: genes, hormones or social construct? 2009, 2010. CLA 399 Classics Capstone: Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome. Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Fishery commons: simulations of alternate management strategies. 2010. E/M 202 Environmental Economics. Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Stream sampling: an exercise in life science and mathematics." 2010. EDU 246 Science for Elementary Educators I. Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

H2O: Uncertain resource” 2009. Nobel Conference Preview Talks given to Curriculum II students, Gustavus Adolphus College, and University of Minnesota Lifelong Learning Class, Minneapolis MN.

Marine fisheries: ecology and exploitation. 2009. BIO 242 Vertebrate Zoology Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Vertebrate endocrine systems. 2008. BIO 386 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology. Gustavus Adolphus College, Saint Peter MN.

Molecular sequence alignment: process and problems. 2007. Graduate seminar in genomics, University of Minnesota at Mankato, Mankato MN.

Darwinian thought and its impacts. 2004, 2005, 2006. GENS 146 Antiquity and Modernity [required first-year interdisciplinary course]. Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Fish morphology. 2005. BIO 110 Fisheries. Blue Mountain Community College, Pendleton OR.

Research at the moment of evolution. 2005. Sigma Xi, Walla Walla Chapter. Walla Walla WA.

Darwin, sex and gender. 2005. GENS 146 Antiquity and Modernity [required first-year interdisciplinary course]. Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Undergraduate grantsmanship. 2005, 2003. BIOL 488 Research Preparation. Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Biological principles of sex, gender and attractiveness. 2004. ARTH 359 Art and Feminism. Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Choosing between grad schools, jobs, and ice cream. 2003. Environmental House, Whitman College, Walla Walla WA.

Macroevolution and the principles of biogeography. 2002. PCB 4674 Evolution. UF Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville FL.

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