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Navigation within a buffer.

The following commands move the cursor within a given buffer. Later sections describe how to move around between buffers.
C-f
moves forward one character (at the end of a line, this goes to the next).
M-f
moves forward one ``word.''
C-b
moves backward one character.
M-b
moves backward one word.
C-a
moves to the beginning of the current line.
M-a
moves backward to next beginning-of-sentence. The precise meaning of ``sentence'' depends on the mode.
M-[
moves backward to next beginning-of-paragraph. The precise meaning of ``paragraph'' depends on the mode.
C-e
moves to the end of the current line.
M-e
moves to the next end-of-sentence.
M-
] moves to the next end-of-paragraph.
C-n
moves down to the next line (at roughly the same horizontal position, if possible).
C-p
moves up to the previous line.
C-v
scrolls the text of the current window up roughly one window-full (i.e., exposes text later in the buffer). If ARG is supplied, it scrolls up ARG lines.
M-v
scrolls the text of the current window down roughly one window-full (i..e, exposes text earlier in the buffer). If ARG is supplied, it scrolls down ARG lines.
C-M-v
scrolls down the text in another window (if any) roughly one window-full. If ARG is supplied, it scrolls up ARG lines.

M-<
moves to the beginning of the current buffer, after setting the mark (see `Regions' below) to the current point. If ARG is supplied, it moves to a point 4#4 of the way through the buffer, instead of the beginning.
M->
moves to the end of the current buffer. If ARG is supplied, it moves to a point 4#4 of the way back from the end of the buffer, instead of the end.
M-g
goes to the line number given by the argument (prompts for a number in the echo line, if you haven't supplied an argument).
M-x what-line
displays the number of the current line in the current buffer.



 
next up previous
Next: Regions. Up: Basic Editing Previous: Simple text.
David Wolfe
1998-12-15